SINTRA
PRESS
PHOTO
OCT 2016 MU.SA
SINTRA'S
ART
MUSEUM

Sintra Press Photo returns to MU.SA with another photojournalism exhibition created and financed by the local council, União de Juntas de Freguesias de Sintra, and organised by Reflexo Theatrical and Cultural Association with the support of Câmara Municipal de Sintra.

With the opening on October 22nd, and in line with last year’s edition, Sintra Press Photo 2016 aims to fulfil a cultural gap in Portugal through an exhibition of photojournalism works by renowned international photojournalists who, during their careers, draw a difficult professional and personal journey guided by an artistic sense allied with the duty to inform.

Following the first edition’s success, where stirring images of life in conflict zones were showed, this year’s Sintra Press Photo will be based around the theme of“Human Plight”.

From Portugal we will be presenting Mario Cruz, a photographer winner of the Contemporary Issues category (features) in this year’s World Press Photo awards, and one of the most promising names in the international photojournalism scene, will be exhibiting “Roof”, an intimate photographic journey into the life of a group of homeless men and women living in abandoned buildings in the Great Lisbon area. The style and sensibility of the Portuguese photographer confront us with the harsh reality of the social stigma affecting thousands in a country deeply scared by economic instability.

From the Democratic Republic of Congo, Phil Moore, an internationally renowned British photojournalist, specialised in the coverage of humanitarian crisis, conflict and political and social issues, will bring to Sintra“Nightwalkers”, a captivating paint like series of photographs focusing on the forced exodus of thousands fleeing war in eastern areas of this African nation. Resembling modernist paintings, the night scenes captured by Phil Moore transmit us the urgency and desperation of a population traumatised by war and in constant forced movement.

The third photographer presenting work in Sintra is Dominic Nahr, from Switzerland. A regular collaborator of TIME Magazine and winner of some of the most prestigious international photojournalism awards, Dominic Nahr will be showing “Fallout”, an unique insight into the drama of Fukushima since the early hours after the Tohoku earthquake and subsequent Tsunami that devastated vast coastal areas of Japan in 2011, culminating in one of the most serious nuclear disaster in modern history. The work of the Swiss photographer show us life and the daunting reality inside Fukushima’s exclusion zone, left practically untouched since the disaster in 2011.

The three photojournalists will be in Sintra for the occasion of the opening of Sintra Press Photo 2016 and to take part in a discussion session where the public will have the opportunity to engage in further conversation about their work and careers.

1987, in Lisbon, Portugal.
Mário Cruz studied Photojournalism at Cenjor - Professional School of Journalism.

In 2006 he started to cooperate with LUSA – Portuguese News Agency / EPA – European Pressphoto Agency.

Since 2012 he’s been focused on his personal projects:

- “Recent Blindness” - Winner of Estacao Imagem 2014 Award

- “Roof” - Winner of Magnum 30 Under 30 Award

- “Talibes, Modern Day Slaves” - Winner of World Press Photo 2016- Contemporary Issues - 1st Prize Stories; Winner of POYi 2016 - Picture of the Year Internacional - Issue Reporting Picture Story; Winner of Estacao Imagem 2016 Award.

His work has been published in Newsweek, LENS - New York Times Blog, International New York Times, CNN, Washington Post, El Pais, CTXT.es and Neue Zürcher Zeitung.

www.mario-cruz.com

Roof (Portugal)

In Lisbon, Portugal, there are about 2800 "partially unoccupied" and over 1800 "completely abandoned" buildings, according to a Lisbon Town Hall study. In addition, there are currently over 800 homeless people living in the streets.
People who live in abandoned sites do not enter the statistics, because a roof has, often, to be an absolute secret for those trying to escape the cold portuguese sidewalks.
In the heart of the city, in the periphery, in the villages off the beaten path, throughout the municipal map, inhuman conditions, fragile lives and lonely battles are hidden day after day.
The unsustainability and fragility of these places are dramatically aligned with the lives they embrace.
These people survive singly but sometimes in community with what others have rejected in the past, whether in buildings, factories or villages they are the testimony of the unemployment crisis, the lack of opportunity and a sad fate that hangs over the Portuguese society.
The identification of sites is purposely preserved in this work.

b. 1982, United Kingdom
Phil Moore is an independent British photojournalist living in north Wales, in the UK. He was formerly based in Nairobi, Kenya, for five years, where he worked predominantly on issues of conflict, civil unrest, and humanitarian crises in the Great Lakes region.
Phil read Computer Science at the University of Sheffield, where he graduated with a B.Sc. in Artificial Intelligence and subsequently worked as a research associate in the department before moving to Paris where he worked in web-design.
He has worked as a photojournalist since 2011, working extensively across Africa, as well as conflict in Syria and Libya, the refugee crisis in Europe, and child labour in Bolivia. He is currently working on several projects, including online identity and nuclear legacies.
His work has been recognised by several international awards and photojournalism festivals.

www.philmoore.info

Nightwalkers (DR Congo)

Their life in flux, populations in the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo are frequently uprooted, and forced to leave their homes when violence arrives. Here, conflict has torn apart communities since the early 1990s, leaving some 5.4 million* dead as a consequence of wars and rebellions. Over 2 million people are displaced.

During the 2012–13 "M23" rebellion, fighting between government forces and the rebels left a dire humanitarian disaster in its wake. People were constantly on the move, decamping from villages torn apart by the ever-changing front-lines. For many, this was not the first time they had fled, and not the first time they had left behind their homes.

Contrasting with the "daily news" images of columns on the move, these images are an attempt to portray the constant uncertainty that populations here live under, particularly at night, when even during times of relative peace, the threat of armed bandits entering a village is ever-present.

*Nobody knows for certain how many people have died as a result of the conflict, which often takes place in remote jungles and hills, but aid agencies commonly use this figure. 

Dominic Nahr (Switzerland, 1983) is based in Kenya, but was raised in Hong Kong and graduated with a BFA from Ryerson University’s photography programme in Toronto, Canada.

Since 2008 Dominic has documented stories across the African continent, from Somalia to Senegal, Mali to South Africa. As a contract photographer for TIME magazine he was witness to the Arab Spring in Egypt, famine in Somalia, border conflicts between the governments of Khartoum and Juba, as well as covering the Tsunami in Japan and the nuclear crisis in Fukushima.

He has been exhibited at the prestigious Visa pour l’image in Perpignan, France in 2009 and again in 2016 and as a Leica photographer was part of the 10x10 exhibition for the 100th anniversary of the Leica Camera. Most recently he took part for the second time at the LUMIX Festival for Young Photojournalism in Hannover, Germany and had a solo show during the famous photography festival Rencontres d'Arles in France, in a collaboration with the Swiss Foundation for Photography and the Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for Documentary and Film.

In 2009 Dominic was the the first recipient of the Oskar Barnack Newcomer Award. He also won in categories at the Sony World Photography Awards and was mentioned by PDN Magazine as one of the ‘Top 30 under 30 Photographers’. He has since been recognised for his work covering events in Sudan by World Press Photo in 2013 and in Egypt, Somalia and Sudan by Pictures of the Year Awards in 2012 and 2013. In January 2015 Dominic was named Swiss Photographer of the Year at Photo15 in Zurich. Most recently he received the Marty Forscher Fellowship Fund for Humanitarian Photography for his work for Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in South Sudan.

His editorial clients include Time, The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, National Geographic Magazine, Stern, Outside Magazine, Monocle, The Wall Street Journal, Schweizer Illustrierte, Neue Zürcher Zeitung, Liberation, Le Monde, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) amongst many others.

Dominic is currently producing a publication that takes a critical but empathetic look at the aftermath of the Tohoku earthquake, tsunami and the nuclear fallout in Fukushima. His work has demonstrated a particular interest in the unabating psychological and physical effects that this devastating environmental disaster has cast on the Japanese population.

www.dominicnahr.com

Fallout (Japan)

Fukushima was an engine of an energy empire.
Nuclear life has a long legacy in contemporary Japan.  It spans from atomic bombs dropped on in Hiroshima and Nagasaki to the one tested at the Bikini Atoll that contaminated hundreds of Japanese fishermen and their boats. Accidents at nuclear facilities are common, although often kept out of the public eye. Japan relies on strict and deeply rooted directives that exist within an isolated society as if an unspoken caste system still remained.

I arrived in Fukushima City a day after the devastating Tōhoku earthquake and Tsunami on March 11th. Soon after there were hydrogen explosions in two reactors, one so powerful it blew the roof off. Thick clouds emerged and moved in different direction. Since then there is a dense haze of stigma in Fukushima - people have been poisoned, their land, their food, their minds. I have been trying to understand the physical, psychological, and environmental wounds inflicted upon those in the radiation zone and beyond.

Dominic Nahr

Dominic Nahr (Switzerland, 1983) is based in Kenya, but was raised in Hong Kong and graduated with a BFA from Ryerson University’s photography programme in Toronto, Canada.

Since 2008 Dominic has documented stories across the African continent, from Somalia to Senegal, Mali to South Africa. As a contract photographer for TIME magazine he was witness to the Arab Spring in Egypt, famine in Somalia, border conflicts between the governments of Khartoum and Juba, as well as covering the Tsunami in Japan and the nuclear crisis in Fukushima.

He has been exhibited at the prestigious Visa pour l’image in Perpignan, France in 2009 and again in 2016 and as a Leica photographer was part of the 10x10 exhibition for the 100th anniversary of the Leica Camera. Most recently he took part for the second time at the LUMIX Festival for Young Photojournalism in Hannover, Germany and had a solo show during the famous photography festival Rencontres d'Arles in France, in a collaboration with the Swiss Foundation for Photography and the Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for Documentary and Film.

In 2009 Dominic was the the first recipient of the Oskar Barnack Newcomer Award. He also won in categories at the Sony World Photography Awards and was mentioned by PDN Magazine as one of the ‘Top 30 under 30 Photographers’. He has since been recognised for his work covering events in Sudan by World Press Photo in 2013 and in Egypt, Somalia and Sudan by Pictures of the Year Awards in 2012 and 2013. In January 2015 Dominic was named Swiss Photographer of the Year at Photo15 in Zurich. Most recently he received the Marty Forscher Fellowship Fund for Humanitarian Photography for his work for Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in South Sudan.

His editorial clients include Time, The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, National Geographic Magazine, Stern, Outside Magazine, Monocle, The Wall Street Journal, Schweizer Illustrierte, Neue Zürcher Zeitung, Liberation, Le Monde, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) amongst many others.

Dominic is currently producing a publication that takes a critical but empathetic look at the aftermath of the Tohoku earthquake, tsunami and the nuclear fallout in Fukushima. His work has demonstrated a particular interest in the unabating psychological and physical effects that this devastating environmental disaster has cast on the Japanese population.

www.dominicnahr.com

Fallout (Japan)

Fukushima was an engine of an energy empire.
Nuclear life has a long legacy in contemporary Japan.  It spans from atomic bombs dropped on in Hiroshima and Nagasaki to the one tested at the Bikini Atoll that contaminated hundreds of Japanese fishermen and their boats. Accidents at nuclear facilities are common, although often kept out of the public eye. Japan relies on strict and deeply rooted directives that exist within an isolated society as if an unspoken caste system still remained.

I arrived in Fukushima City a day after the devastating Tōhoku earthquake and Tsunami on March 11th. Soon after there were hydrogen explosions in two reactors, one so powerful it blew the roof off. Thick clouds emerged and moved in different direction. Since then there is a dense haze of stigma in Fukushima - people have been poisoned, their land, their food, their minds. I have been trying to understand the physical, psychological, and environmental wounds inflicted upon those in the radiation zone and beyond.

Mário Cruz

1987, in Lisbon, Portugal.
Mario Cruz studied Photojournalism at Cenjor - Professional School of Journalism.

In 2006 he started to cooperate with LUSA – Portuguese News Agency / EPA – European Pressphoto Agency.

Since 2012 he’s been focused on his personal projects:

- “Recent Blindness” - Winner of Estacao Imagem 2014 Award

- “Roof” - Winner of Magnum 30 Under 30 Award

- “Talibes, Modern Day Slaves” - Winner of World Press Photo 2016- Contemporary Issues - 1st Prize Stories; Winner of POYi 2016 - Picture of the Year Internacional - Issue Reporting Picture Story; Winner of Estacao Imagem 2016 Award.

His work has been published in Newsweek, LENS - New York Times Blog, International New York Times, CNN, Washington Post, El Pais, CTXT.es and Neue Zürcher Zeitung.

www.mario-cruz.com

Roof (Portugal)

In Lisbon, Portugal, there are about 2800 "partially unoccupied" and over 1800 "completely abandoned" buildings, according to a Lisbon Town Hall study. In addition, there are currently over 800 homeless people living in the streets.
People who live in abandoned sites do not enter the statistics, because a roof has, often, to be an absolute secret for those trying to escape the cold portuguese sidewalks.
In the heart of the city, in the periphery, in the villages off the beaten path, throughout the municipal map, inhuman conditions, fragile lives and lonely battles are hidden day after day.
The unsustainability and fragility of these places are dramatically aligned with the lives they embrace.
These people survive singly but sometimes in community with what others have rejected in the past, whether in buildings, factories or villages they are the testimony of the unemployment crisis, the lack of opportunity and a sad fate that hangs over the Portuguese society.
The identification of sites is purposely preserved in this work.

Phil Moore

b. 1982, United Kingdom
Phil Moore is an independent British photojournalist living in north Wales, in the UK. He was formerly based in Nairobi, Kenya, for five years, where he worked predominantly on issues of conflict, civil unrest, and humanitarian crises in the Great Lakes region.
Phil read Computer Science at the University of Sheffield, where he graduated with a B.Sc. in Artificial Intelligence and subsequently worked as a research associate in the department before moving to Paris where he worked in web-design.
He has worked as a photojournalist since 2011, working extensively across Africa, as well as conflict in Syria and Libya, the refugee crisis in Europe, and child labour in Bolivia. He is currently working on several projects, including online identity and nuclear legacies.
His work has been recognised by several international awards and photojournalism festivals.

www.philmoore.info

Nightwalkers (DR Congo)

Their life in flux, populations in the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo are frequently uprooted, and forced to leave their homes when violence arrives. Here, conflict has torn apart communities since the early 1990s, leaving some 5.4 million* dead as a consequence of wars and rebellions. Over 2 million people are displaced.

During the 2012–13 "M23" rebellion, fighting between government forces and the rebels left a dire humanitarian disaster in its wake. People were constantly on the move, decamping from villages torn apart by the ever-changing front-lines. For many, this was not the first time they had fled, and not the first time they had left behind their homes.

Contrasting with the "daily news" images of columns on the move, these images are an attempt to portray the constant uncertainty that populations here live under, particularly at night, when even during times of relative peace, the threat of armed bandits entering a village is ever-present.

*Nobody knows for certain how many people have died as a result of the conflict, which often takes place in remote jungles and hills, but aid agencies commonly use this figure. 

Joint Organization

Teatro Reflexo

Rua da Pedreira, 14-A
2710-121 Cabriz, Sintra

P +351 214213188
www.teatroreflexo.org
info@sintrapressphoto.com

União Freguesias Sintra



www.uniaofreguesiassintra.pt
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